Posts tagged ‘test’

November 26, 2020

Why am I Especially Thankful This Year?

This year has been, um, challenging for all of us. I know there’s a good chance that you have a more colorful word to describe 2020. So, given how tough the year has been, why am I especially thankful this year?

Quite simply, I’m grateful to still be alive. I’m not just talking about avoiding COVID-19. You see, it’s almost seven years since I was diagnosed with an exceedingly rare, deadly form of cancer, Appendiceal Carcinoma with Pseudomyxoma Peritonei (PMP). If it wasn’t for brilliant medical intervention, my last Thanksgiving would have been in 2014.

Because a number of people have been asking me how my health is, and because some people with PMP are seeking insights on the Internet, I thought I would take this opportunity to provide an update. In addition, I want to share some news that has implications for your fundraising efforts.

Since 2014, I’ve had two massive, 14-hour surgeries with each followed a short time later by an additional two-hour surgery. I’ve also undergone extensive chemotherapy treatments to slow the progression of the cancer. Furthermore, I’ve been receiving mistletoe extract injections to mitigate chemo side effects and, perhaps, enhance the effectiveness of the chemo. Unfortunately, there is no cure for PMP. The best I can hope for is to slow the disease and delay the need for the next huge surgery. Not only will that enhance my quality of life, it will extend my life because there is a limit to the surgical option.

Last week, I received my latest CT Scan result. That report, along with my recent blood test results, reveals that my cancer is stable! That means I’m able to take a break from chemo for two to three months, beginning just in time for Thanksgiving.

Thanks to an army of doctors and nurses, especially those at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and University of Pennsylvania – Penn Medicine, I’m still here. I also need to mention that Lisa, my wife, is a critical part of my care team. I couldn’t have made this journey over the past seven years without her. Every time I look at her, I’m reminded that, despite everything I’ve been through, I’m still the luckiest guy on Earth.

My adventure hasn’t been easy. At times, it’s been absolutely brutal. On a daily basis, it’s a struggle. But, with a great medical team and the support of family, friends, colleagues, and clients, I continue to move forward. There’s too much to do for me to start wallowing now.

Recently, I received some additional good news. UPMC is expecting to receive approval soon for a clinical trial of a minimally invasive treatment that would further delay the need for another big surgery. I’m a candidate for this. The treatment has already shown promise in Australia-based testing. If all goes according to plan, the treatment will enhance the quality of my life while extending it.

This brings me to your fundraising program.

July 26, 2019

All You Need to Know about Decrease in Itemized Charitable Deductions

When it comes to philanthropic trends, recent media reports have left many fundraising professionals lost in the weeds and confused by misleading analysis. So, I’m going to give you the most important insights about individual giving that you need to know now along with three practical tips.

First, here’s some quick background. Overall, charitable giving reached an historic high in 2018 with $427.71 billion contributed, according to Giving USA 2019. Despite this great news, individual giving, excluding bequests, fell 1.1 percent to $292.02 billion. There are many reasons for the slight dip, which you can read about in one of my prior posts. One of the factors that may have played a role is the new tax code. With it, we saw a dramatic increase in the number of taxpayers taking the standard deduction and a drop in the number choosing to itemize their deductions.

That brings us to a big takeaway that almost no one is talking about:

The charitable tax-deduction is not a substitute for a solid case for support.

This was true prior to passage of the Tax Cut and Jobs Act; it’s even more true today. Before the new tax code went into effect, less than one-third of taxpayers itemized their returns, and less than one-quarter of taxpayers claimed a charitable tax-deduction. Now, only about 10 percent itemize and 8.5 percent claim a charitable deduction, according to the Tax Policy Center. To put things another way, for the majority of donors, tax issues were never a viable consideration when it came to charitable giving. Today, tax considerations are an issue for even fewer people.

This all means that the classic, but foolish, year-end appeals touting the tax benefit of giving before December 31 are even more irrelevant than ever. Furthermore, it means that the relevance of the idea of year-end giving itself has been diminished. If someone doesn’t need to do year-end tax planning, why would they need to wait until year-end to donate? The reality is most people can give at any time with the same effect on their finances.

In light of all of this, here are the three things you should do:

read more »

%d bloggers like this: