Posts tagged ‘Partnership for Philanthropic Planning’

September 7, 2012

5 Lessons Every Nonprofit Can Learn from a Starbucks Barista

Starbucks has built an international reputation for making a fine cup of coffee. But, did you know that you can learn at least five valuable lessons from a Starbucks barista?

I’m not talking about learning how to make a great espresso or cappuccino. While a Starbucks barista could certainly help you with that, I’m talking about five lessons every nonprofit development professional can learn to be a more effective fundraiser.

The lessons don’t come from just any barista, though. I’m talking about Nicole who fixes beverages at the Starbucks in the Nashville International Airport.

Let me tell you my story, and share with you what I learned from Nicole:

Lesson 1: Never say, “It’s not my job.”

I was just passing through Nashville on my way to a speaking engagement for the Association of Fundraising Professionals St. Louis Regional Chapter. I had to make a connecting flight. I passed a Starbucks on the way to my gate. There was a line, but I had plenty of time. So, I queued up for my trenta-iced-unsweetened-green-tea.

I patiently waited to place my order with the cashier, the normal procedure. But, I was startled by the voice of the barista. She called over to me, before I had even made my way to the cashier, to ask for my order. I was surprised. It actually took me a moment to understand what she was doing. Then, I gave her my order.

By the time I made it up to the cashier and paid for my drink, instead of the usual wait, Nicole had it ready for me. I was stunned with how quickly the line moved and how quickly I was served. Because this experience was so vastly different than any other Starbucks experience I have ever had, and because I had some time to kill before my flight, I stood and just watched the operation. I wanted to understand what was so special about this Starbucks. That’s when I realized that the difference was Nicole.

She could have simply waited until the cashiers gave her drink orders to fill. After all, it was not her job to take orders. But, Nicole saw a line of passengers trying to rush off for their flights. She knew they needed to get in and get out as quickly as possible. And, because she was able to assist, she did even though it wasn’t her job.

In our own organizations, it’s easy to fall back on our job descriptions. It’s easy to think, “It’s not my job. Let someone else take care of it.” But, when everyone in our organizations goes the extra distance for those receiving service or those donating money, we show that we care.

My wife was recently treated at Lankenau Medical Center. It’s a large facility. When walking down the hall, if you even look confused, a member of the staff will stop and offer assistance. Even doctors will do this. This is just one small example of the caring culture at Lankenau.

At most other hospitals I’ve visited, this has not been the case. I guess folks at those other hospitals think it’s not their job to help lost visitors, that’s what the information desk is for. Anyway, can you guess which hospital has a warm place in my heart for this and so many other reasons?

If you and your colleagues refuse to say, “It’s not my job,” you’ll help take a step toward creating or enhancing your own culture of caring. When you do that, you’ll be building relationships that make fundraising much easier.

Lesson 2: Be customer/donor centered.

Nicole was definitely customer focused. She knew we were all concerned about making our flights. So, she did what she could to keep us moving along. And, she anticipated our needs.

One of my pet peeves with Starbucks is that after I get my beverage, I always have to hunt for where they have the straws and napkins. Then, I have to figure out which straw goes with my beverage size. It wastes time, and it makes me feel stupid as I stumble around trying to find these items.

However, Nicole knows this straw-hunt ritual is a time waster. So, understanding my needs, she made sure to have the correct straw right there next to my iced-tea.

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August 14, 2012

Special Report: PPP Hires New President/CEO

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Michael Kenyon

The Partnership for Philanthropic Planning has announced it has hired a new President/Chief Executive Officer. Michael Kenyon will assume the position on October 26, 2012. The position has been held by Tanya Howe Johnson, CAE who announced, in September 2011, her plan to step down after 20 years in the position.

PPP issued the following email message on behalf of Michael Kateman, PPP Board Chair:

 

To: PPP members and friends

From: Michael Kateman, Chair, PPP Board of Directors

On behalf of the Board of Directors, I’m very pleased to announce that Michael Kenyon is the new President and CEO of the Partnership for Philanthropic Planning.

Michael brings a deep passion for the arts and extensive association leadership expertise to his new role with PPP. For the past 11 years, he has been Executive Director of the Percussive Arts Society. At PAS, he led an international music service organization that promotes percussion education, research, performance and appreciation, with 7,500+ members, 50 U.S. chapters and 28 international chapters. Michael’s experience at PAS also includes production of an annual conference that attracts 5,000+ attendees. Among many successful initiatives at PAS, Michael led the organization through development of new facility for the Rhythm! Discovery Center, a museum and educational space that USA Today recently named one of the top places in the United States for hands-on music making.

Michael began his professional life as a musician, working as a drummer with the Glenn Miller Orchestra and a Broadway touring company, and with symphony and jazz ensembles in Arizona, Ohio and New York City. After nearly seven years of performing and touring, he sought a career with a broader scope and transitioned into nonprofit and arts administration. He worked with St. Martin’s Hospitality Center for the homeless and Celebrate Youth, which was recognized by the Kellogg Foundation as an exemplary program in the development of young adults. He also served as executive director of the New Mexico Jazz Workshop, where he oversaw all financial and operational functions of the organization and was also involved in fundraising. Michael holds a Bachelor of Music, Music Performance, and a Master of Music, Performance Pedagogy, both from Arizona State University.

Michael is no stranger to the worlds of fundraising and charitable gift planning. At the New Mexico Jazz Workshop, he was responsible for raising voluntary contributions to cover 30% of the organization’s annual budget. At PAS, he oversaw all fundraising efforts including the annual campaign and the establishment of several endowed scholarships, and specific purpose funds established through charitable remainder trusts.

I encourage you to attend the National Conference on Philanthropic Planning, October 3-5, in New Orleans, where I look forward to introducing you to Michael. He will officially join the PPP staff on October 26.”

 

As a PPP member and Immediate Past President of PPP of Greater Philadelphia, I wish Kenyon well. This is an important transition time for PPP. I look forward to seeing what the Kenyon-era will mean for PPP, the membership, and philanthropy. There are certainly great challenges ahead. But, with those challenges, there are also great opportunities. It will be interesting to see how effectively PPP grapples with the challenges and seizes the opportunities.

That’s what Michael Rosen says… What do you say?

June 15, 2012

The Nonprofit Sector Has Lost a Good Friend

The nonprofit sector lost an ardent supporter, and my wife and I lost a very close friend on June 6, 2012.

Lisa Halterman (1954-2012)

Lisa Maxine Reisman Halterman touched countless lives. We are all better off for the time she was with us, which was far too brief. Even if you never knew Lisa, she has improved your world in immeasurable ways. Think of a pebble tossed into a still pond causing ripples to expand outward. The impact of Lisa’s philanthropy rippled outward as well.

Lisa was involved with and supported a variety of organizations including the Please Touch Museum, the Rittenhouse Square Flower Market, the Curtis Institute of Music, the Rosenbach Museum, the Philadelphia Film Festival, the Philadelphia Children’s Alliance, and the Philadelphia Area Repertory Theatre. She even hosted a special reception to benefit the Association of Fundraising Professionals Political Action Committee.

Though very different from each other, these organizations all enhance the quality of the lives of those they serve and, as a result, enable or inspire those individuals to improve the lives of others. The ripple effect.

Lisa’s philanthropy was generous. Parenthetically, and sadly, not a single nonprofit organization seriously approached her for a planned gift.

Only 22 percent of Americans over the age of 30 say they have been asked to consider a planned gift, according to a report from The Stelter Company. So, I’m not exactly surprised that Lisa was never asked. I just wonder how many other lost opportunities there are every single day? How many people are in your database that should be asked for a planned gift that you just haven’t gotten around to asking?

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January 13, 2012

Enter Now to Win a Free Planned-Giving Book

I always find January to be a bit of a let-down. By contrast, December is very festive with Chanukah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, Festivus, and New Year’s Eve. But January? January is dark, cold, and filled with post-holiday malaise.

So, I thought I would do something to bring a bit of fun into January.

In honor of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Day of Service (January 16), publisher John Wiley & Sons and I will be giving away one free copy of my book, Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing.

MLK Day recognizes the birth of King while encouraging citizen action. Many in the nonprofit sector have embraced this day to promote volunteerism. Since my book helps nonprofit organizations secure much needed resources, I thought a planned-giving book give-away would be just one small thing I could do at this special time of year.

In a moment, I’ll tell you how you can enter to win. First, I want to say that I think planned giving is a very attractive way for individuals to support favorite charities, especially during challenging economic times.

A few years back, I was trying to explain to my oldest, childless aunt what it is I do for a living. I tried explaining planned giving. Grasping what I was saying, she asked, “Why on Earth would someone give to a charity after they’re dead?” I asked her, “What charities do you support now?” Among the organizations she supports is an animal welfare group. I then asked, “Who’s going to take care of the little puppies and kittens after you’re no longer here to keep writing checks?” Her eyes widened and, in that moment, I think I might have lost my inheritance.

Planned giving allows people to continue to support organizations they are passionate about after they are no longer here to keep writing checks. In addition, planned giving may help donors lower their taxes, pass money and property on to heirs in an efficient way, generate an income, or provide major gifts to organizations without making any sacrifice during their lifetime. All of these benefits of planned giving are magnified during challenging economic times.

For these reasons, among others, I strongly believe that now is a great time to talk with people about gift planning. Today, given economic uncertainty, individuals might be uncomfortable making a significant financial gift out of current cash. However, those same individuals might be perfectly willing to provide some type of deferred contribution or life-income gift.

Only 22 percent of Americans over the age of 30 say they have been approached by a nonprofit organization to consider a planned gift, according to a survey by the Stelter Company. Imagine how much more revenue would be generated if more nonprofit organizations asked more people for a planned gift.

Now, let me tell you how to enter the book give-away.

For your chance to win a free copy of Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing, simply comment below.

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January 12, 2012

Special Report: PPP Announces New Board Officers

The Partnership for Philanthropic Planning has named its governing officers for 2012:

  • Chair: Michael W. Kateman, Executive Director, Development, Alumni and Public Relations, Columbia College
  • Chair-elect: Jeffrey Lydenberg, Vice President, Consulting, PG Calc Inc.
  • Secretary: Jill Dodd, Partner, Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP
  • Treasurer: Melanie Schnoll Begun, Managing Director, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Philanthropic Services
  • Conference Program Chair: Greg Sharkey, Senior Philanthropy Advisor, The Nature Conservancy

Tanya Howe Johnson, President and CEO of PPP, will continue serving on the Executive Committee until her retirement, April 30, 2012. PPP is engaging in a national search for her successor.

PPP engages in research, education, advocacy, community dialogue and the setting of standards and best practices in philanthropic planning. PPP is supported by 113 local councils and over 8,000 individual and council members, as well as charities, associations and business organizations that support the mission of charitable giving made most meaningful. For more information about PPP, visit: www.pppnet.org.

That’s what Michael Rosen says… What do you say?

September 20, 2011

Special Report: CEO of Partnership for Philanthropic Planning Announces Plan to Retire

The Partnership for Philanthropic Planning has announced that Tanya Howe Johnson, CAE, will step down from her position as president and CEO in April 2012 after over 20 years leading the organization. PPP’s individual and council members include more than 8,000 fundraisers and financial advisors involved in the process of helping donors plan and make major charitable gifts. A search process to find her successor will begin within the coming months.

I’ve had the privilege of working with Tanya over the years. I’ve always found her to be an ardent advocate for philanthropic planning and for the people who make it happen. This is something that surely helped convince The Nonprofit Times to twice name her one of the 50 most powerful and influential leaders in America’s nonprofit sector.

On a more personal note, I’m tremendously honored by Tanya’s endorsement of my book, Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing: “The number one training topic requested by PPP members is planned gift marketing. Michael Rosen answers that need with a well-organized approach, interesting anecdotes, a reader-friendly writing style, and a wealth of practical information.”

I thank Tanya for her support of my book and, more so, for her contributions to philanthropic planning.

For more information, you can find the official PPP statement here.

That’s what Michael Rosen Says… What do you say?

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