Posts tagged ‘Google’

November 15, 2019

Fundraising Reality Check: 5 Things You Need to Know

A number of myths continue to persist in the fundraising world. While I can’t debunk all of them here, I can deliver a reality check for five important items that I’ve encountered recently when talking with fellow fundraising professionals:

Myth 1: Most People Do Not Own Stocks

Reality Check: The fact is that a majority of Americans own stocks in one form or another. Gallup found that 55 percent of Americans have stock market investments. The greater one’s income, the more likely they are to own stock.

While the stock markets remain volatile, they continue to set new records. In other words, many charity donors own appreciated securities. Under the current federal tax code, anyone can benefit by contributing appreciated stock to a nonprofit organization. That’s because donors of appreciated stocks can avoid paying capital gains tax even if they are non-itemizers who take the standard deduction.

If you’re not asking your prospects and donors to donate appreciated securities, you’re not serving them well and you’re missing out on donations that could be quite significant. So, be sure to let people know that your organization accepts stock gifts, what the benefit is to donors of contributing stocks, and how they can gift stocks.

Myth 2: Giving Tuesday Will Help You Raise Tons of Money

Reality Check: I’m not opposed to #GivingTuesday. My problem with it is that many charities invest an amount of staff and budget resources that will never be justified by the return. In 2018, US charities raised $380 million, reports the Nonprofit Source. For perspective, that’s just 0.089 percent of overall philanthropy for the year. Furthermore, while 63 percent of Giving Tuesday donors give only on Giving Tuesday, we really don’t know if that’s a correlation or a causality; many of those donors might have given anyway on another day.

If you’re going to implement a Giving Tuesday appeal, do it the right way:

  • Have realistic expectations and invest resources accordingly.
  • Remember that a date on the calendar is not a case for support. Don’t ask people to give to your organization just because it’s Giving Tuesday. Let them know what problem their gift will address.
  • Have a thank-you and stewardship plan in place if you want to retain and eventually upgrade Giving Tuesday donors.

Myth 3: Charities Can Ignore Donor-Advised Funds

Reality Check: Okay, charities can ignore Donor-Advised Funds. However, they should not. DAFs accounted for 12.7 percent of overall philanthropy in 2018 compared with just 4.4 percent in 2010, according to The National Philanthropic Trust’s The 2019 DAF Report. In other words, DAF grant payouts totaled $23.42 billion. Total DAF charitable assets were $121.42 billion and climbing. The number of DAF accounts in 2018 was 728.563, a 55.2 percent increase over 2017.

The simple fact is that DAFs continue to grow in significance year after year. More and more donors are creating DAFs. You need to make it easy for people to recommend grants to your charity. You need to properly steward DAF donors and those who recommend DAF grants. You need to keep track of which of your supporters has established a DAF. You need to remind people that, if they have a DAF, they can recommend your charity for a grant.

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March 23, 2015

Discover What Company CSR Executives are Thinking

Over the years, I’ve actually heard nonprofit managers and development professionals say:

“[That company] should give more.”

“I can’t believe [that company] is not giving. They certainly can afford to.”

“Corporations should do more to support their local communities.”

“Corporations should give back!”

The last one is my personal favorite because it’s complete nonsense. A corporation exists to produce a product or service and generate a profit for its shareholders. That’s it.

CSR Boat by Jack Temple via FlickrAs for “giving back,” corporations do so everyday even if they never donate a dime to charity or sponsor a charity program or event. Corporations meet a public need or desire by producing products or services. They employ people. They buy or rent from other businesses. They pay taxes. Their employees pay taxes and buy or rent things, which further stimulates the economy.

In a previous post, I wrote, “There’s No Such Thing as Corporate Philanthropy!” I explained, “Corporate Philanthropy does not, or at least should not exist. While corporations may give to charitable causes, it is not or should not be out of an altruistic sense of Corporate Social Responsibility.”

If corporations make donations, those grants should enhance shareholder value in some way. A contribution might have a direct impact on profitability or the effect might be indirect. Either way, the donation or sponsorship should strengthen the corporation, say many corporate executives.

Marc Gunther, a senior writer for Fortune Magazine, wrote, “I’m not a big fan of corporate philanthropy. Too often, it’s a feel-good exercise, generating little value for a company’s shareholders. At its worst, it allows CEOs to use other people’s money to glorify themselves.”

As corporate philanthropy, as a term if not a practice, began to fall out of favor, it was replaced with Corporate Social Responsibility. But, what is CSR?

Harvard University defines CSR strategically:

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October 27, 2014

Pew Charitable Trusts Encourages Voting

The Pew Charitable Trusts, along with Google and election officials nationwide, have developed The Voting Information Project to encourage people to vote on US Election Day, November 4, 2014. Together, they’re offering cutting-edge tools that give voters access to the customized information they need to cast a ballot on or before Election Day.

Vote by Theresa Thompson via FlickrThe Voting Information Project is offering free apps and tools that provide polling place locations and ballot information for the 2014 election across a range of technology platforms. The project provides official election information to voters in all 50 states and the District of Columbia and voters can find answers to common questions such as “Where is my polling location?” and “What’s on my ballot?” through the convenience of their phone or by searching the web.

For more information, use the Voter Information Tool:

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