Posts tagged ‘collaboration’

March 3, 2017

5 Tips for Raising More Money in a Difficult News Environment

Nonprofit organizations already face many challenges when it comes to raising money. So, it’s unfortunate that numerous charities must now deal with a fresh, difficult situation.

In a recent article in The Chronicle of Philanthropy, reporter Rebecca Koenig explains:

Charities always find it difficult to capture attention, but some nonprofits fear that their donors are distracted by President Trump’s policies. ‘Backlash philanthropy,’ the trend of donating money to express frustration with the new administration, has benefited select organizations like Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union but not necessarily nonprofits as a whole.”

If Trump Administration policies directly affect your organization’s mission, fundraising can be relatively easy. Indeed, some charities have benefitted microphone-by-yat-fai-ooi-via-flickerfrom record philanthropy since Election Day. However, what can you do if your organization’s mission has little or nothing to do with the debates capturing media attention?

Koenig’s report provides great tips, insights from nonprofit professionals, and helpful detail. If you’re a Chronicle subscriber, you can find the article by clicking here. I thank Koenig for interviewing me for her article. If you’re not a subscriber, fear not. I’m about to share some highlights with you.

As I told the Chronicle:

The most important advice I could give an organization not directly impacted by the current political environment is to embrace fundamental practice and keep moving forward.”

So, in that spirit, here are five tips to help guide you along with my comments, in quotations, from the article:

Tip 1: Avoid obvious attempts to connect your organization to causes that don’t relate to your mission.

“If it’s a stretch, then the recipient of the appeal is going to see through it and see it as a gimmick, It’s not going to be particularly effective.” Instead, think of what has been motivating your donors all along, and continue to tap into those feelings.

Tip 2: Maintain good relationships with current donors.

Steadily declining donor-retention rates over the past several years suggest that the nonprofit sector has been doing a terrible job of building relationships with donors. Now, perhaps more than ever, it’s essential for charities to do a better job in this area. This is particularly true for organizations over-shadowed by news events. You can search this site for donor relations to find posts with helpful advice. However, here’s one useful idea: Report to donors how their contributions have been and will be used.

“The more specific an organization can be with a donor, the more that donor will feel like they’re making a difference, If a donor feels he or she is bringing about change, this will help drive further philanthropy to that organization.”

You also want to ensure that your prospects and donors understand that the challenges you’re working on are not going away even if the media spotlight may not be on your cause.

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May 9, 2015

If You Want $1 Million, Be Creative

A wise person once said, “It’s not just what you say, but how you say it.”

Another wise person once stated, “A picture is worth a thousand words.”

Creatively taking these two aphorisms together can lead to great fundraising success. Consider what happened when the City of Philadelphia competed for a $1 million grant in the Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Mayors Challenge:

Mayors Challenge InfographicGood Company Ventures, the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, and the Philadelphia Department of Commerce collaborated on a grant application for their Philadelphia Social Enterprise Partnership.

With over 300 cities from 45 states competing, the Philadelphia collaborative knew it needed to do something to standout. The Philadelphia team prepared the required written proposal, which came in at 30 pages of dense content.

Then, they contracted with David Gloss and his team at Here’s My Chance, a Philadelphia-based creative agency that works with nonprofit organizations. HMC was tasked with helping Philadelphia’s proposal submission standout from the crowd.

Gloss went to work and produced an infographic that would accomplish two things: 1) Distinguish the Philadelphia proposal from the others. 2) Provide an easy to understand summary of the 30-page proposal.

With an energetic, clean infographic branded in Philadelphia’s colors and a detailed written proposal, the Philadelphia team earned a spot as one of the Top 20 finalists. In the next round of the competition, finalists were asked to submit a short video describing their proposed program and the impact it would have.

Once again, HMC went to work. Here is how HMC describes what happened next:

Being a Top 20 finalist is pretty sweet…but winning is even sweeter. For the next round, all finalists created videos, and we knew ours had to be the Beyoncé of all entrants: bold, professional, and flawless. To allow for more freedom and flexibility for that, we decided to produce an animated video. Then, we booked the talent. Not only did Mayor Michael Nutter provide a voice over for the video, but he appeared in it as well.”

At the end of the long competition, Bloomberg Philanthropies named Philadelphia as one of the five winners, awarding the city $1 million! By the way, Philadelphia was the only winner to have submitted an animated, rather than live-action, video.

So, what can we learn from this?

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December 7, 2012

Overcome Challenges thru Collaboration

The Luna Theater Company hosted an open house for the kick-off of its special fundraising campaign. What made this event unusual was the fact that Luna does not have a “house” to open. Since its first season in 2002, Luna has performed on a number of stages in Philadelphia.

Pew at Church of the CrucifixionNot having a home of its own, Luna hosted its open house at the Church of the Crucifixion. Confused? Let me explain.

The collaboration between the theater company and the church is an excellent example of how nonprofit organizations, even those with seemingly very different missions, can come together to help each other meet their unique challenges.

Crucifixion is an historic church. It is the sixth oldest African-American Episcopal Church in the United States. W.E.B. Du Bois, the historian, civil rights activist, and co-founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), was a member of the parish as was famed opera singer Marian Anderson. Unfortunately, with age comes a need for renovation and maintenance.

In the Crucifixion parish house, there is a large auditorium. It’s a bland, empty room with an ugly drop ceiling. While the parish priest would like to renovate the room to its historic beauty by revealing the high, vaulted ceiling that exists above, pressing maintenance needs and limited funds make this project an unfortunately low priority.

Luna Theater (Twitter: @LunaTheaterCo)Luna is a young, vibrant theater company producing intimate, intelligent, and intense work that delves into the human psyche with an emphasis on the tragic-comic. Luna wants a permanent 99-seat home. This will give Luna more flexibility for its various programs and productions. It will help it build its own identity with its audiences. And, it will help control its costs. But, building a theater is a massive, cost-prohibitive undertaking for a small theater company.

That’s where Partners for Sacred Places came in. Partners is a national nonprofit organization working with religious congregations to ensure that their older sacred places remain a rich and vital part of the social fabric of a community. Partners helped facilitate the collaboration between Luna and Crucifixion.

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