Posts tagged ‘Bank of America’

July 6, 2012

Two Major Factors that Demotivate Donors

I recently spent a fair bit of time teaching graduate students, in my “Advanced Fund Development” class at Drexel University, about what factors motivate major and planned gift donors. Much research has been done and much has certainly been written on the subject. I even felt strongly enough about the topic to have devoted a full chapter to it in my book, Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing.

While it is critically important to understand what motivates people to donate money and, more specifically, to make major and planned gifts, it is also necessary to recognize how individuals can become demotivated.

While an organization’s being polarizing (see my previous post about The Salvation Army), self-centered, or running afoul of the factors that motivate people will certainly demotivate prospective donors, there are two particular demotivating factors that are especially noteworthy. The George Washington University discovered the two factors in a focus group study it commissioned involving university alumni.

Taking care of family is a primal need.

One of the biggest deterrents to making bequest commitments is the universally held belief:

Family comes first.

That’s to say, family comes before any nonprofit organization. The priority for most individuals is to take care of their loved ones. This often means keeping wealth within the family. To respond to this concern, organizations need to show prospects how a meaningful gift can be made, at a minimum, without asking loved ones to suffer. When possible, prospects should be shown how a planned gift can actually benefit loved ones. Consider this example from the Smithsonian Institution that was shared with me by John B. Kendrick:

When I first arrived at the Smithsonian Institution as Director of Planned Giving, a colleague recommended that I contact Cliff, a person who had responded to a [Charitable Gift Annuity] advertisement in Smithsonian magazine a few months before. Cliff wanted to make sure the Smithsonian was strong financially. At age 96, he was still incredibly alert mentally, and he wanted to provide a lifetime income for his wife, who was nearly 20 years younger.

He appreciated the Smithsonian, but frankly was more concerned about the safety of her guaranteed payments than supporting a particular charitable purpose. A consultant to the Smithsonian had traded more than 20 e-mails with Cliff, who originally inquired about a $10,000 CGA.

As he became convinced of the Smithsonian’s financial strength, he quickly increased his inquiry to a CGA for $1 million. But no one had ever called him—they had simply been trading e-mails! I telephoned Cliff, and the discussion quickly progressed; within another two months he sent in stock certificates to establish a $500,000 CGA for his wife. Over the next year, he created two additional $500,000 CGAs for his wife—for a total of $1.5 million.

But that’s not the end of the story.

He had a son who was not strong with money management. Cliff still actively managed his own finances and made periodic distributions to his son. I suggested setting up a CGA or Charitable Remainder Trust now for the son, but Cliff insisted that he wanted to manage his money outright for as long as possible. We agreed, however, that a testamentary CGA for his son would meet his desires. I provided sample language, and Cliff’s lawyer modified his estate plan to include a $2 million testamentary CGA.

From a $10,000 inquiry, we received $3.5 million in gifts because we took the time to show Cliff how we could help him take care of his family.”

The other major demotivator discovered by The George Washington University is:

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September 30, 2011

7 Things You Should Know about Seniors that You Probably Don’t

Photo by Visentico/Sento via Flickr

There are seven things you should know about older Americans that just might surprise you and help you with your fundraising efforts. U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management published the report U.S. Trust Insights on Wealth and Worth-TMbased on its 2011 survey of Americans with an average age of 61 and investable assets of at least $3 million.

There are now approximately 5.6 million households in the U.S. with more than $1 million in investable assets, including 4.8 million with $1 million to $4.99 million and 782,000 households with more than $5 million in investable assets, of which approximately 182,000 have greater than $10 million in investable assets.

Here’s what you need to know:

Of those with net worth of $3 million or more, 40 percent do not consider themselves “rich.” They may consider themselves “comfortable” or “financially secure,” but not “rich.” So, when speaking with those who you may consider to be wealthy, consider that they may not define themselves in the same way. So, be sure to speak their language. For example, many people think that a “bequest” is something that only rich people do and, therefore, there’s a good chance that they will not think this is an option for them since they’re not rich. When talking about a charitable bequest commitment, you might be far better off keeping it simple by talking about “supporting your favorite charity through your will.”

Older, wealthy Americans believe the most important use of wealth is to ensure financial security for themselves and their families. So, when speaking with these individuals, show them how philanthropic planning can benefit them and their families. For example, a Charitable Gift Annuity can provide them with an income for life. Or, a gift of appreciated stock rather than cash can help them avoid capital-gains tax. Also, be sure that donor prospects understand that you’re not seeking all or even a large portion of their wealth. Let them know that you understand the old adage that charity begins at home. By being donor-centered, you’ll have a happier prospect who will be much more willing to support your organization.

Among older, wealthy Americans, 40 percent say they do not have an estate plan that is comprehensive. There are many reasons for this. They may simply not have gotten around to it. They may not know what their options are. They may not know what the elements are of a comprehensive estate plan. They may not know to whom to turn for assistance. This presents you with an opportunity to be of service. You can educate these people and guide them to get their estate plan in order. In the process, you’ll have the opportunity to discuss how philanthropic planning can be an effective, desirable part of estate planning. And, you will earn the gratitude of those you assist.

Only about one-third (34 percent) of parents agree strongly that their children will be able to handle the inheritance they plan to leave them. This is an opportunity for you to show parents how they can structure their estates to confidently take care of their children while also benefiting their favorite charity. Again, by being of service to prospective donors, you can ultimately help your nonprofit organization.

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