Posts tagged ‘CFRE International’

December 20, 2013

Have You Read Any Good Books Lately?

Wise fundraising professionals, nonprofit managers, consultants, and volunteers, often seek out the latest, greatest ideas, and have an interest in stories that can inspire.

If you are like many in the nonprofit world, you read books to discover the ways to generate improved results or to find inspiration.

Bookworm by PMillera4 via FlickrNow, I invite you to share the favorite book(s) you’ve read in the past year. Please use the “Leave a Reply” section below to provide the title and author of any fundraising, nonprofit management, or philanthropy book that you found particularly worthwhile to read. The book you recommend can be either a classic or a new title.

The objective here is to build a list of worthwhile books we should all consider adding to our 2014 reading lists.

By recommending a book here, you’ll get three benefits:

1. You’ll have the pleasure of helping your nonprofit brothers and sisters find worthwhile material that can help them and their organizations.

2. You’ll be entered into a drawing to win a free copy of my bestselling book, Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing. I’m honored to have won the AFP/Skystone Prize for Research in Fundraising and Philanthropy for this book. In addition, I’m pleased that my book has been placed on the CFRE International Resource Reading List because my goal was to get this valuable, practical information to as many people as possible. If you already have a copy (Thank you!), I’ll donate the winning copy to your favorite charity. One winner will be randomly selected on January 10, 2014.

November 22, 2013

Is CFRE Spinning Its Wheels?

I’m not sure. CFRE International is either spinning its wheels or it is poised for growth. Either way, it needs and welcomes our advice.

I see articles and postings that promote the Certified Fund-Raising Executive (CFRE) credential from time to time. Most recently, I saw:

 “New CFRE Website and Online App” posted by Garvin Maffett in the CFRE International Network Group on LinkedIn (Oct. 31, 2013)

“Are You Certified?” by F. Duke Haddad in FundRaising Success (Nov. 8, 2013)

As someone who has held the CFRE designation longer than 89 percent of all others, I care about and support the credential. So, I’m pleased to see that CFRE Spinning Wheels by cpaparcuri via FlickrInternational has a new, easier to use, more robust, more service-oriented website. I’m also pleased to see others promoting the CFRE designation.

However, despite my enthusiasm for the CFRE credential, I continue to be troubled. Two years ago on this site, I asked, “Does CFRE Have a Future?” My concerns persist. As of 2012, there were 5,630 CFRE holders worldwide, according to the CFRE International annual report. That’s just a 5.7 percent increase over the number of certified professionals in 2007.

That’s a miniscule five-year growth rate.

Depending on how you count larger (expenditures of $500,000 or more) and active public charities, the sector has seen growth of approximately 12 percent in the US since 2004/05.

That means the CFRE growth rate of 5.7 percent has not even kept pace with the growth rate of the nonprofit sector in the US. Every year, CFRE has been becoming less significant, relative to the market, despite its modest rate of growth.

The number of CFREs relative to the number of development professionals is modest at best. The number of CFREs in the US and Canada is about 17 percent of the number of members of the Association of Fundraising Professionals.

February 19, 2013

Special Report: Do You Want to Talk with an Award-Winning Author?

Have you ever read a book and wished you could talk directly with the author? Did you ever want to pick the brain of the author to get additional helpful ideas? Have you had questions about the material that you desired to explore more deeply? Were you ever curious about the author’s view of the future? Did you ever wonder what parts of the book the author felt were most important? Did you ever want to let the author know which parts of the book you particularly liked or which parts you disagreed with? Have you ever wanted to know if the author had acquired valuable, new information since writing the book?

If you answered “Yes” to any of the above questions, I have a special opportunity that will interest you.

I (Michael J. Rosen, CFRE) will be interviewed on The Nonprofit Coach Radio Show on Tuesday, February 26, 2013 at 12:00 PM (EST).

Donor-Centered Planned Gift MarketingI wrote the bestselling book Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing, for which I won the AFP/Skystone Prize for Research in Fundraising and Philanthropy. The book is on the official CFRE International Resource Reading List. I’ll be discussing the book with host Ted Hart, ACFRE. We’ll also look at the challenges and opportunities presented by recent changes in government policy.

During the program, listeners will have the opportunity to call in to ask questions. You can learn more about the broadcast and find the call-in number by clicking here.

I invite you to listen to the show live and to participate by calling in to the program. If you’re unable to listen to the live show, you will be able to stream it after the broadcast.

November 7, 2012

Special Report: Rosen Successfully Renews CFRE

I have recently received the official news that I have successfully completed the Certified Fund-Raising Executive renewal process!

I’m proud of this accomplishment. While I have criticized CFRE International in the past, I remain committed to the credential that I first earned in 1994. Certifying development practitioners has many potential benefits, both to the individual and the nonprofit sector. Certification is one of the hallmarks of a true profession.

January 13, 2012

Enter Now to Win a Free Planned-Giving Book

I always find January to be a bit of a let-down. By contrast, December is very festive with Chanukah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, Festivus, and New Year’s Eve. But January? January is dark, cold, and filled with post-holiday malaise.

So, I thought I would do something to bring a bit of fun into January.

In honor of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Day of Service (January 16), publisher John Wiley & Sons and I will be giving away one free copy of my book, Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing.

MLK Day recognizes the birth of King while encouraging citizen action. Many in the nonprofit sector have embraced this day to promote volunteerism. Since my book helps nonprofit organizations secure much needed resources, I thought a planned-giving book give-away would be just one small thing I could do at this special time of year.

In a moment, I’ll tell you how you can enter to win. First, I want to say that I think planned giving is a very attractive way for individuals to support favorite charities, especially during challenging economic times.

A few years back, I was trying to explain to my oldest, childless aunt what it is I do for a living. I tried explaining planned giving. Grasping what I was saying, she asked, “Why on Earth would someone give to a charity after they’re dead?” I asked her, “What charities do you support now?” Among the organizations she supports is an animal welfare group. I then asked, “Who’s going to take care of the little puppies and kittens after you’re no longer here to keep writing checks?” Her eyes widened and, in that moment, I think I might have lost my inheritance.

Planned giving allows people to continue to support organizations they are passionate about after they are no longer here to keep writing checks. In addition, planned giving may help donors lower their taxes, pass money and property on to heirs in an efficient way, generate an income, or provide major gifts to organizations without making any sacrifice during their lifetime. All of these benefits of planned giving are magnified during challenging economic times.

For these reasons, among others, I strongly believe that now is a great time to talk with people about gift planning. Today, given economic uncertainty, individuals might be uncomfortable making a significant financial gift out of current cash. However, those same individuals might be perfectly willing to provide some type of deferred contribution or life-income gift.

Only 22 percent of Americans over the age of 30 say they have been approached by a nonprofit organization to consider a planned gift, according to a survey by the Stelter Company. Imagine how much more revenue would be generated if more nonprofit organizations asked more people for a planned gift.

Now, let me tell you how to enter the book give-away.

For your chance to win a free copy of Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing, simply comment below.

January 6, 2012

Actions of One Alleged & One Admitted Child-Rapist Impact You

An alleged child-rapist and an admitted child-rapist are in the news again. Both news stories involve large sums of money.

The first news item concerns former Penn State Football Defensive Coordinator Jerry Sandusky and the University’s year-end fundraising efforts. (You can read my first blog post about Sandusky and Penn State: “Tragic Lessons of the Penn State Fiasco.”) While I hope you never have to cope with such a heinous crisis in your professional life, you will, unfortunately, be likely to find yourself dealing with at least one major challenge during your career. The Penn State situation is instructive.

The second news item concerns famed movie director Roman Polanski and his recently released film Carnage. At the end of this post, I’ll very briefly discuss the idea of not enriching this admitted child rapist through the purchase of a movie ticket.

Jerry Sandusky (middle)

On November 5, 2011, in the midst of the prime year-end fundraising season, Pennsylvania Attorney General Linda Kelly and State Police Commissioner Frank Noonan announced the results of a grand jury investigation that led to Sandusky being charged with sexually abusing eight boys. Two Penn State officials were also charged with related crimes though neither was directly involved in the abuse. A total of four Penn State officials either resigned or were fired within days of the release of the grand jury report including living legend, Coach Joe Paterno.

Penn State has been working to deal with the various challenges resulting from the Sandusky mess. The development staff has had the monumental task of having to continue to raise money for Pennsylvania’s flagship public university.

An Associated Press report has revealed, “‘The overwhelming majority of [Penn State’s] leading donors have made public statements affirming their faith in the University and its future,’ according to the University’s talking points. The document named a couple who gave $88 million to launch an NCAA ice hockey program, and another who endowed the position of head football coach. Both the number of donors and number of gifts to Penn State increased in November, compared with the same month a year earlier. Total donations to Penn State were $3.1 million in November, compared to $1.1 million in November 2010, according to the University. Another positive sign for Penn State was [December’s] announcement of a $10 million gift from an anonymous donor to bridge engineering research projects with other fields of study.”

A year-end annual fund appeal provides some insight into how the development staff is handling the fundraising challenge. Garvin Maffett, EdD, Executive Consultant at INJOY and a Penn State alumnus, received an annual fund email appeal in December from the University. He posted the appeal on LinkedIn at the CFRE International Network Group. If you’re a CFRE and would like to see the reaction the posting received, go to LinkedIn and subscribe to the Group. The responses have been generally constructive and supportive.

Here is the Penn State appeal from Dec. 19 as posted by Maffett:

The recent allegations against former and current Penn State employees have shaken our community to its core. But the University’s central mission to educate the leaders of tomorrow is as important now as ever before. We are 96,000 students, 46,000 employees, and more than half a million alumni. We are a university committed to providing educational opportunities and improving the lives of our students and communities. We are Penn State.

The University, led by our newly appointed president, Rodney A. Erickson, is working to repair the trust of the Penn State community and the nation. We are pursuing an aggressive, independent investigation of the allegations and a reevaluation of the University’s protocols and procedures, and have promised to share the results with the public. In addition, the President will be appointing a University-wide ethics officer to ensure we continue to meet the moral standards our institution has long represented.

We recognize that this is also an opportunity to increase awareness at the societal level about the devastating impact of sexual abuse. At the heart of these accusations is the issue of child abuse, and, as members of a leading research institution, we believe we can do much to bring awareness and change. To begin these efforts, Penn State is establishing the Penn State Hershey Center for the Protection of Children. The center, which will be located at the Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital, will bring together clinicians, scientists, legal scholars, and educators to improve the detection, treatment, and prevention of child maltreatment. In addition, the University has partnered with the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape (PCAR) and the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, and has committed $1.5 million of our share of this year’s Big Ten bowl proceeds to help fund initiatives with these organizations.

We thank you for your loyalty and dedication to the University, and we ask you to continue to show your support for Penn State. As the University moves forward, we will also be relying upon the leadership of alumni like you, who represent all that’s best about Penn State in your own communities every day. There’s never been a more important time for Penn Staters to stand up for the values and the institution that we believe in. By remaining focused on the work of our students and faculty and the goals of For the Future: The Campaign for Penn State Students, we will make Penn State a better, prouder, and stronger university.

Choose to support Penn State; make your gift today.

Thank you!

Ann E. Lehman

Director, Penn State Annual Giving 

P.S. Follow this link to make a special gift of support to the Penn State Hershey Center for the Protection of Children.”

November 1, 2011

Special Report: AFP Webinar, “Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing”

On November 1, I did a webinar for the Association of Fundraising Professionals. The program was titled: “Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing.” If you missed the webinar, you can purchase a recording, slides, and handouts directly from AFP by visiting http://afp.peachnewmedia.com/store/provider/provider09.php. The program is approved for credit by CFRE International.

If you were able to participate in the webinar, I invite you to post comments or questions below. We can continue the conversation here.

The webinar bears the same name as my book, Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing. The book is on the official CFRE International Resource Reading List. For writing the book, I was honored to receive the AFP-Skystone Partners Prize for Research in Fundraising and Philanthropy.

I thank AFP for inviting me to do the webinar. And, I thank the AFP Greater Philadelphia Chapter and the Community College of Philadelphia for providing my host location for the presentation.

[Publisher's Note: "Special Reports" are posted from time-to-time as a benefit for subscribers and frequent visitors to this blog. "Special Reports" are not widely promoted. To be notified of all new posts, including "Special Reports," please take a moment to subscribe in the right-hand column.]

October 4, 2011

Special Report: CEO of CFRE International Resigns

[Publisher's Note: "Special Reports" are posted from time-to-time as a benefit for subscribers and frequent visitors to this blog. "Special Reports" are not widely promoted. To be notified of all new posts, including "Special Reports," please take a moment to subscribe in the right-hand column.]

CFRE International has announced that CEO Denny Smith, PhD has resigned effective immediately. Smith served for two years. CFRE International issued an official press release which can be downloaded by clicking here.

You can read my August 26, 2011 post “Does CFRE Have a Future?” by clicking here.

August 26, 2011

Does CFRE Have a Future?

The Certified Fund-Raising Executive credential was created in 1981 to promote professionalism in fundraising practice. Now, on the 30th anniversary of the creation of CFRE, I thought I would take a few moments to consider whether CFRE has a future.

One might automatically think that CFRE will enjoy a bright future. After all, the credential has a 30-year track record. The market of fundraising professionals is growing worldwide. In the United States alone, the number of nonprofit organizations required to file with the Internal Revenue Service grew from 246,733 in 1999 to 315,662 in 2009, a 28 percent increase. (These numbers do not include the hundreds of thousands of religious congregations not required to file or the hundreds of thousands of nonprofit organizations that raise less than $25,000 a year; the numbers also do not include tens of thousands of foundations.)

The idea that fundraising is actually a profession has also taken root in recent decades with the dramatic increase in educational opportunities including college and university certificate and degree programs in nonprofit management and fundraising. As the nonprofit sector takes fundraising more seriously, as the number of nonprofit organizations grows thereby increasing the number of fundraising practitioners, one could conclude that the rapidly growing potential market for CFRE would mean a rosy future for the credential.

Another sign pointing to a healthy future is the CFRE recertification rate. Among those who hold the CFRE designation, satisfaction seems to be high with “a healthy recertification rate well above the average rate for voluntary certification programmes,” according to CFRE International, the credentialing organization for CFRE

Unfortunately, the future for CFRE is not automatically secure. Today, there are 5,322 holders of the CFRE credential, including myself, of which 4,422 reside in the U.S. Assuming that every reporting 501(c)3 has at least, and no more than, one person doing fundraising, that means that CFRE’s market penetration in the U.S. is about 1.4 percent! After 30 years, that’s a rather lackluster market penetration rate, suggesting the credential is crawling rather sprinting into the future.

The average number of newly certified professionals has averaged just 445 worldwide from 2007-2010, according to the 2010 Annual Report from CFRE International. While this number grew over the previous three-year period, it’s certainly not a number that realizes the potential. Between 2007 and 2010, the worldwide number of CFRE holders grew by just one percent!

The CFRE credential faces a number of serious challenges including:

Competition: Other credentialing programs exist including the Chartered Advisor in Philanthropy and the Advanced Certified Fund-Raising Executive. In addition, master’s degree programs compete with the CFRE credential. During a recent conversation on Twitter hosted by #fundchat (a weekly discussion on Twitter about fundraising issues that is held every Wednesday from 9:00 – 10:00 PM, Eastern time), a number of participants questioned the value of obtaining a CFRE designation if they’re going to get a master’s degree related to the profession; the thinking was that a related master’s degree is at least as strong a credential as a CFRE.

Economics: CFRE is a voluntary certification. Government regulators do not require it. The decision to obtain a CFRE, is purely up to the individual professional. Making the decision to pursue a CFRE comes with a big price tag. First-time certificants must pay $618, if they are a member of a participating organization, or $778, if they are not. Those recertifying must pay a fee of $360, if they are a member of a participating organization, or $453, if they are not. Many employers are unwilling to pay for their employees to become certified, and many development professionals are unwilling or unable to pay the significant fee themselves. I suspect this will be particularly true in these tough economic times.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 689 other followers

%d bloggers like this: